Preparing for Your Next
Series: Holiday

Preparing for Your Next

Are you SMART? We all think we are and hope we are. Book-smart is easily achieved --- read, study, learn. Heart-smart and life-smart are harder to achieve. For these kinds of smarts we still need to read, study and learn about ourselves. How do we do that? Achieving each type of smarts requires setting goals. Not just setting the goals but PLANNING for them. And for that, you need SMART goals. This can mean the difference between success and failure.

Proverbs 24:27
Prepare your work outside; get everything ready for yourself in the field, and after that build your house.

Goals for weight loss can focus on outcomes or the process. An outcome goal - what you hope to achieve in the end - might be to lose a certain amount of weight. While this goal may give you a target, it doesn't address how you will reach it. A process goal is a necessary step to achieving a desired outcome. For example, a process goal might be eating five helpings of fruits or vegetables a day, walking 30 minutes a day, or drinking half your body weight of water (in ounces) every day. Process goals may be particularly helpful for weight loss because you focus on changing behaviors and habits that are necessary for losing weight. Your SMART goals need to be:

  • Specific. A good goal includes specific details. For example, a goal to exercise more is not specific, but a goal to walk 30 minutes after work every day is specific. You're declaring what you will do, how long you will do it, and when you will do it.
  • Measurable. If you can measure a goal, then you can objectively determine how successful you are at meeting the goal. A goal of eating better is not easily measured, but a goal of eating "x" calories a day can be measured. A goal of riding your bike is not measurable. A goal of riding your bike for 30 minutes three days a week is measurable.
  • Attainable. An attainable goal is one that you have enough time and resources to achieve. For example, if your work schedule doesn't allow spending an hour at the gym every day, then it wouldn't be an attainable goal. However, two weekday trips to the gym and two weekend trips might be attainable. If a particular type of exercise, such as running, is physically too difficult for you, then running every day would not be an attainable goal.
  • Realistic. Process goals must also be realistic. For example, your Grace and Strength Coach can help you determine a daily calorie goal based on your current weight and health. Setting an unrealistic goal may result in disappointment or the temptation to give up altogether.
  • Trackable. Goals are best achieved if you keep a record of your progress. If you have an outcome goal of losing 50 pounds, record your weight each day or week. If your goal is to eat "x" calories a day, keep a food diary. Keeping track can help you evaluate your progress and stay motivated.

And remember, you are not alone! HE is with you always!

Proverbs 3:5-6
Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths.

When you vision your goals, and ponder your Dreams for the New Year, be reminded of the promise of FRUITFULNESS! We see the promise of fruitfulness, in God's glory (eternity), and our own increasing discipleship (here in our present).

Be SMART next year and trust in Him to guide you and nuture you!


Weekly Challenges

Members: Go to the Members Area to view your body, soul, and spirit challenges and submit your feedback. You may need to log in first.

Preparing for Your Next
Series: Holiday

Preparing for Your Next

Are you SMART? We all think we are and hope we are. Book-smart is easily achieved --- read, study, learn. Heart-smart and life-smart are harder to achieve. For these kinds of smarts we still need to read, study and learn about ourselves. How do we do that? Achieving each type of smarts requires setting goals. Not just setting the goals but PLANNING for them. And for that, you need SMART goals. This can mean the difference between success and failure.

Proverbs 24:27
Prepare your work outside; get everything ready for yourself in the field, and after that build your house.

Goals for weight loss can focus on outcomes or the process. An outcome goal - what you hope to achieve in the end - might be to lose a certain amount of weight. While this goal may give you a target, it doesn't address how you will reach it. A process goal is a necessary step to achieving a desired outcome. For example, a process goal might be eating five helpings of fruits or vegetables a day, walking 30 minutes a day, or drinking half your body weight of water (in ounces) every day. Process goals may be particularly helpful for weight loss because you focus on changing behaviors and habits that are necessary for losing weight. Your SMART goals need to be:

  • Specific. A good goal includes specific details. For example, a goal to exercise more is not specific, but a goal to walk 30 minutes after work every day is specific. You're declaring what you will do, how long you will do it, and when you will do it.
  • Measurable. If you can measure a goal, then you can objectively determine how successful you are at meeting the goal. A goal of eating better is not easily measured, but a goal of eating "x" calories a day can be measured. A goal of riding your bike is not measurable. A goal of riding your bike for 30 minutes three days a week is measurable.
  • Attainable. An attainable goal is one that you have enough time and resources to achieve. For example, if your work schedule doesn't allow spending an hour at the gym every day, then it wouldn't be an attainable goal. However, two weekday trips to the gym and two weekend trips might be attainable. If a particular type of exercise, such as running, is physically too difficult for you, then running every day would not be an attainable goal.
  • Realistic. Process goals must also be realistic. For example, your Grace and Strength Coach can help you determine a daily calorie goal based on your current weight and health. Setting an unrealistic goal may result in disappointment or the temptation to give up altogether.
  • Trackable. Goals are best achieved if you keep a record of your progress. If you have an outcome goal of losing 50 pounds, record your weight each day or week. If your goal is to eat "x" calories a day, keep a food diary. Keeping track can help you evaluate your progress and stay motivated.

And remember, you are not alone! HE is with you always!

Proverbs 3:5-6
Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths.

When you vision your goals, and ponder your Dreams for the New Year, be reminded of the promise of FRUITFULNESS! We see the promise of fruitfulness, in God's glory (eternity), and our own increasing discipleship (here in our present).

Be SMART next year and trust in Him to guide you and nuture you!


Weekly Challenges

Members: Go to the Members Area to view your body, soul, and spirit challenges and submit your feedback. You may need to log in first.

Are you ready to take the first step?

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* Individual results may vary.